Things get fishy at St. Mary’s Catholic School

Saturday, March 30, 2019
Students in the first and second grade classroom Sally Heidlage, at St. Mary’s Catholic School in Pierce City, recently created clay model critters for a pond habitat in the gym for their science project. In the front row, from left, are: Zoe Gurley, Carly Landoll, Avrey Blackburn, Kelcie Taylor, Jhade Torrez, Michael Masri, Brent Beard and Jay Brown. Back row: Blake Landoll, Cael Torrez, Kellen Avondet and Isaac Chorum. Absent from photo were Cecelia Marchlewski and Kyler Rivera. Contributed photo

Students create special projects for pond habitat studies

The first and second grade students at St. Mary's Catholic School in Pierce City worked on a special project for their science chapters on pond habitats on Friday, March 15.

Each student was required to make a pond creature out of Crayola Model Magic and paint it. Students had to explain what their creature was, whether it lived on land, water or both, and what it ate, as they placed it into the pond habitat. The students also had the opportunity to write some camping rules and recipes for making baked beans over a campfire, however, they were not told what the sentences would be. Like the game Mad Libs, students were asked to provide nouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs.

Students in the first and second grade classroom of Sally Heidlage, at St. Mary’s Catholic School in Pierce City, had the opportunity to make s’mores and create recipes for baked beans as part of their project during their study on pond habitat, settling in around a campfire between activities. In the front row, from left, are: Kelcie Taylor, Brent Beard, Zoe Gurley, Carly Landoll, Cael Torrez and Kellen Avondet. Back row: Michael Masri, Jhade Torrez, Isaac Chorum, Avrey Blackburn, Blake Landoll and Jay Brown. Absent from photo were Cecelia Marchlewski and Kyler Rivera. Contributed photo

“After the children had written down their word choices, I read the sentences to them,” said Sally Heidlage, teacher. “We had a lot of laughs as I read their rules and recipes inserting their word choices. They have some very interesting and silly rules and recipes.”

Students also received a pudding “dirt” cup, which contained a gummy worm for a pet. Students were asked to write how they would take care of their pet worm. “Needless to say, most of the worms did not make it home that day.” Heidlage said. “During the day, the students also made s'mores around a "campfire," sang a camp song, and enjoyed other special activities. This project is probably my favorite project to do with the children and I hope they enjoyed it as much as I did.”