[Monett Times] Overcast ~ 64°F  
High: 73°F ~ Low: 47°F
Saturday, Apr. 30, 2016

Academy takes to the range

Wednesday, December 12, 2012

(Photo)
Times Photo by Melonie Roberts Lawrence County Sheriff Brad DeLay watches academy students on the firing line at the law enforcement firing range in Aurora during their firearms training on Saturday, Dec. 1. A total of 13 students are enrolled in the second law enforcement academy, hosted by the Lawrence County Sheriff's Office in Mt. Vernon. [Order this photo]
A total of 13 new law enforcement academy students were on the firing range this weekend, performing a series of exercises to familiarize them with their weapons and position transitions for combat-style situations.

Students took to the field to practice using handguns, shotguns with a variety of loads ranging from birdshot to slugs, and transitioning positions and weapons during a live-fire sequence. Students shot from standing, kneeling and prone positions, and often had to re-load their weapons in mid-sequence.

"We're just getting them used to a variety of scenarios," said Lawrence County Sheriff Brad DeLay. "Students have to qualify for the job by meeting minimum standards."

(Photo)
Times Photo by Melonie Roberts Lt. Mike Madewell, Lawrence County Sheriff's Office, demonstrated a firing sequence for students taking part in firearms training on Saturday, Dec. 1 at the law enforcement firing range in Aurora. Students must become proficient in a variety of firing positions, transitions and weapons as a part of the minimum requirements for graduation. [Order this photo]
The firing range instructors were Lt. Mike Madewell and DeLay from Lawrence County Sheriff's Office, and Ben Ramsey, of the Aurora Police Department. Other instructors included, but not present at the exercise, are J.J. Golbourne, with the Lawrence County Sheriff's Office, and Wyatt Sharp, a retired officer and private trainer who lives in Aurora.

The range was purchased by the Monett and Aurora Police Departments and the Lawrence County Sheriff's Office from the Missouri Department of Conservation after members of the Aurora Trap and Skeet Club dissolved. The field is being developed for use by law enforcement officials for training or re-qualification certification in firearms.

"This is a wonderful asset for law enforcement agencies throughout the county," DeLay said. "It also provides a place for students to conduct their firearms training during the course of their classes."

(Photo)
Times Photo by Melonie Roberts Students at the law enforcement academy, hosted by the Lawrence County Sheriff's Office, practiced several firing sequences during a recent weekend firearms training exercise in Aurora. Students shot at targets from 17 feet away in a variety of firing positions, transitions and weapons as a part of their law enforcement training. [Order this photo]
Shooters spend a portion of their afternoon collecting empty shell casings from the ground so the brass can be recycled and the funds used for continued improvements to the range.

"They'll have shot several hundred rounds and will have some sore shoulders by the end of the weekend," said Madewell. "Bird shot is easy. Slugs are a bit harder."

Students in this class range in age from a retired Marine to a 22-year-old.

"This is a great opportunity for anyone wanting to enter the field of law enforcement," DeLay said. "Most of these students have full-time jobs and attend classes at night and on weekends."

The law enforcement academy, the second hosted by the Lawrence County Sheriff's Office, started in August and will continue until June 2013. Students are instructed in weapons, hand-to-hand combat, tasers, jail operations and a variety of writing and hands-on training necessary to complete the course.



Respond to this story

Posting a comment requires free registration:

© 2016 Monett Times, a division of Rust Publishing MOARCASS, L.L.C. All rights reserved.